There is no official national register of pensioners in the country of Uganda

The ministry of Public Service says many pensioners do not show up for verification hence leading to delays in payment of their monthly dues and the once off gratuity. Courtesy photo

By Nelson Wesonga

Kampala

Government says it does not have records of pensioners due to “lack of data and personal files.”

According to the ministry of Public Service, many pensioners do not show up for verification thus leading to delays in payment of their monthly dues and the once off gratuity.

The State minister for Public Service, Mr David Karubanga told MPs during plenary that the ministry will, carry out a census and biometric validation of pensioners starting February 20.

“The ministry of Public Service does not have a national register of pensioners,” Mr Karubanga said yesterday.

“Despite the decentralisation of pension management, a number of votes [ministries] have not verified the records on the payroll.”

A day earlier, Aruu Member of Parliament, Odonga Otto had told the August House that many pensioners have not been paid for several months.

Many were, therefore, depending on their relatives – who already have other financial responsibilities – to pay their bills or to buy basics.

Those without relatives are borrowing items from shopkeepers.

Shopkeepers though can only lend them for a few months expecting to be paid once they get their gratuity.

Following Mr Odonga’s remarks, the Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga said the government was treating the senior citizens disrespectfully.

On Wednesday, Mr Karubanga also said the Public Service ministry had for the last four years not carried out verification of pensioners “due to funding shortage and lack of clear addresses" [of the pensioners].

The verification of the pensioners will be done between February 20 and March 24 at the district headquarters by Face Technologies.

According to Mr Karubanga, Face Technologies will do the work, which the ministry failed.

However, it is still not clear how much the ministry will pay the company.

Face Technologies is the company that processes driving permits for motorists.

Workers Members of Parliament Margaret Rwabushaija and the Erute Member of Parliament Jonathan Odur said the government should tell Ugandans when it would pay the pensioners all their arrears.

Mr Karubanga said payments are the responsibility of the Finance ministry.

All that Public Service does is to furnish the Finance ministry with the particulars of the claimants.



There is no official national register of pensioners in the country of Uganda

The ministry of Public Service says many pensioners do not show up for verification hence leading to delays in payment of their monthly dues and the once off gratuity. Courtesy photo

By Nelson Wesonga

Kampala

Government says it does not have records of pensioners due to “lack of data and personal files.”

According to the ministry of Public Service, many pensioners do not show up for verification thus leading to delays in payment of their monthly dues and the once off gratuity.

The State minister for Public Service, Mr David Karubanga told MPs during plenary that the ministry will, carry out a census and biometric validation of pensioners starting February 20.

“The ministry of Public Service does not have a national register of pensioners,” Mr Karubanga said yesterday.

“Despite the decentralisation of pension management, a number of votes [ministries] have not verified the records on the payroll.”

A day earlier, Aruu Member of Parliament, Odonga Otto had told the August House that many pensioners have not been paid for several months.

Many were, therefore, depending on their relatives – who already have other financial responsibilities – to pay their bills or to buy basics.

Those without relatives are borrowing items from shopkeepers.

Shopkeepers though can only lend them for a few months expecting to be paid once they get their gratuity.

Following Mr Odonga’s remarks, the Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga said the government was treating the senior citizens disrespectfully.

On Wednesday, Mr Karubanga also said the Public Service ministry had for the last four years not carried out verification of pensioners “due to funding shortage and lack of clear addresses" [of the pensioners].

The verification of the pensioners will be done between February 20 and March 24 at the district headquarters by Face Technologies.

According to Mr Karubanga, Face Technologies will do the work, which the ministry failed.

However, it is still not clear how much the ministry will pay the company.

Face Technologies is the company that processes driving permits for motorists.

Workers Members of Parliament Margaret Rwabushaija and the Erute Member of Parliament Jonathan Odur said the government should tell Ugandans when it would pay the pensioners all their arrears.

Mr Karubanga said payments are the responsibility of the Finance ministry.

All that Public Service does is to furnish the Finance ministry with the particulars of the claimants.



In Uganda, Poverty, hunger drive up prostitution rates:

The social pain for all in prostitution

22 May, 2019

Written by the Observer, Uganda

 The attraction of prostitution in a poor African country

 

Many African women who live at or below the poverty line are forced to sell their bodies in order to make ends meet. The women do not notice anything of the many poverty relief programs that exist on paper in their countries.

This is the conclusion of a study by the African Investigative Publishing Collective (AIPC), conducted in close collaboration with ZAM magazine. AIPC is a team of investigative journalists; it is not an academic research institution or a polling agency.

For this research, journalists spoke to 226 women of all ages from around 12 to 60, randomly selected in townships, squatter camps and villages, in dilapidated rentals, on markets, at bus stations and other community hubs, in seven African countries.

Close to two third of these women, 148 to be precise, resorted to the ‘last resource’ and mentioned to be scared of HIV/AIDS and death. They said that most customers didn’t want to use condoms and that they did not have access to proper health care. It was because of this pervasive fear that was all over the answers we received, that we decided on the subtitle ‘Risking death to feed your kids.’ 

The interviewing exercise was carried out by a predominantly female team of the AIPC in Nigeria, South Africa, Liberia, Uganda, Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Kenya.

Lastly, to protect the interviewed women’s privacy, we changed all their names –including the first names.

Recommendations

In a conclusion, the AIPC says that bad governance seems to be at the root of much of the misery experienced by the women and recommends that donor governments and multilateral organisations focus more on strengthening public administration and rule of law in countries such as the ones in the report, rather than simply allocating budgets to incapable governments.

In another conclusion, the AIPC calls for more research to see if its observation that bad governance seems to be at the root of much of the misery experienced by the interviewed women can be further substantiated.

It recommends that donor governments and multilateral organisations, if that is the case, should focus more on strengthening public administration and rule of law in countries such as the ones in the report. 

Here’s one of the articles compiled by Patience Akumu from Uganda with the support of the Pascal Decroos Fund.

A very public secret

HIV will kill you in twenty years, but hunger in two days.

“Who has never done it? They will not tell you but every woman here in Kamwokya is a prostitute,” says Emma, the hair dresser. “Look around. Even this hair salon cannot make money. How do you think they survive?” HIV will kill you in twenty years, but hunger will kill you in two days, the women in the Kampala slum tell one another.

Some keep up appearances for the outside world, often even for their own families and neighbours, but most know there is no escape from sex work. Even Bridget, who just had a baby, plans to go back into the streets, because “a husband may leave anytime” and even when he is there, he often doesn’t “leave money on the table” for groceries.

Many who have come here, to Kampala’s slums, have moved away from meagre existences elsewhere. Often, men still come with some starting capital, even if little; they have sold off land and other property to find greener pastures.

But in a culture where assets are passed on to men via male-only inheritance, most women leave the village with nothing. The women that we talked to in many cases fled abusive marriages; some ran to Kampala with their children while others left the children behind.

The women came to town with nothing

Either way, the women have to find a way to get money; not just for themselves but also to send back home, for children, aging parents and other relatives. Jobs being scarce, they are domestic workers for richer families in town, or try to run businesses, like Emma. But it is not enough. The women in Kamwokya hate what they have to do for relatives back home, food, milk for the baby, rent and school fees.

“Sex work is not like any other job. The men usually only care about their satisfaction. We are meant for love not to sell sex. But what can you do when you have not eaten for two days?” sighs Winnie, who helps in Emma’s hair salon.

There is an omnipresent fear for AIDS, even if you have to blank it out as you go about your business. All of the women mention it. Abbo, who works in a night club, and smells of beer on her breath, tells me how one day this man came and said he would give her 500,000 Ugandan shillings (about US$ 150).

“I was excited and I went with him. He did not want condoms and, when he was done, he told me the money was for buying my coffin. He said he had given me HIV. After months of being scared, I went to check and I had it.” Life should not be like this for women, many say angrily. They blame “useless men and the government.”

Women empowerment

It should not be like this especially in Uganda, which is ranked among the top five women empowerment countries in Africa, with thirty-four percent of parliamentarians being women.

President Museveni, in power since 1986, has repeatedly said that the country is on the way to middle-income status, too. But about a third of the population still live in extreme poverty, on less than US$ 1.9 per day, and most of these are women.

With the wealth gap widening, and the government variously focusing on the fight against short skirts, pornography and gays instead of on governance, employment and education, the women of Kamwokya have little hope for improvement.

Passover church is where the people of Kamwokya go to nourish their spirit. Even if they know what many in the area do to survive, they will call prostitution ‘the work of Satan’ when the subject comes up.

“When you are hungry, when your husband chases you from home and you have nowhere to sleep,” Latifah says, “you pray. It is better than selling your body. Selling your body is the work of Satan.”

Outside the one-roomed house she shares with a husband and three children, Latifah says she wants to leave her husband because he mistreats her and does not give kameeza- money men traditionally give their wives to cater for daily household needs.

“You know how men become. He has stopped me from working. Yet, he does not always buy food. The other day he bought a sack of posho (ground maize) and beans. That is what we have been eating for a month.

He comes back drunk and angry and he beats me and the children. If I don’t get either a job or help from an NGO, I will go home and dig (the soil to plant, PA).”

Your husband might kill you

In the village of Tororo in eastern Uganda, there are still eight out of fifteen who say they will never become ‘prostitutes,’ that one should ‘stay strong and stay hungry, and ‘pray to God to provide.’

Diremba fears your ‘husband might kill you’ if he finds out what you do, even if he does not leave money on the table and your stomach is grumbling. “You must just work harder,” say Hope and Velma.

But market restaurant stall owner Nomono already crossed the line. “I have done it but I hope it does not mean I am a prostitute,” she says apologetically. She sells food for as little as a thousand Ugandan shillings (about US$ 30 cents) a plate. It is all her clientele can afford but it is not enough.

Everyone here talks about sick parents, a sick sister, paying back loans, money to farm because the farm is dying. There are those who don’t care anymore and openly solicit clients.

“You ask us about sex for money. These are the consequences. This baby here,” Bertha’s sisters joke about her fatherless toddler. All three sisters go with truck drivers who pass through Tororo.

They know the game well: they were raised with the money their mother got this way. Even so, none of the teenage girls was able to complete school. They joined the trade partly because their mother “has suffered enough,” says Amy, who is fifteen years old. Several Ugandan MPs and the Gender ministry were approached for comment. None replied.

Patience Akumu had wanted to check the northern part of Uganda, too. The region around Gulu has always been the poorest and has also been ravaged by war: first the war waged by Joseph Kony’s the Lord’s Resistance Army, now as an area where many refugees from South Sudan end up.

A traditional opposition stronghold, the area continues to be very sensitive. Army and police buzz around at many roadblocks. Patience Akumu was stopped from going on with interviews; formal government clearance was requested.

Since sex work is illegal and very broadly defined under Ugandan law, her research would have come under intense scrutiny. She opted to go interview elsewhere. Tororo, in Eastern Uganda, was the second option, since it is also counted among the country’s poorest regions and has recently overtaken the north as the poorest region in the country.

This article was researched and written by African Investigative Publishing Collective in close collaboration with ZAM magazine.

 

 

 

 

 

The government of Uganda is failing to protect the African domestic wives from being eaten by crocodiles in Lake Victoria(Nalubaale): 

Pregnant woman eaten by crocodile in Namayingo.

It is necessary for this African country to contact the Australian government who have greater control of wild crocodiles on large environmental farms:

By Moses Bikala

 

Added 13th January 2019

 

Residents tried to rescue the woman by throwing metals at the reptile, but all was in vain, a witness said.

 

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The Namayingo beach on Lake Victoria

 

TRAGEDY                   

LAKE VICTORIA (NALUBAALE) AT NAMAYINGO  - Tragedy befell residents of Lolwe islands, Lolwe subcounty Namayingo district when a 35-year-old pregnant woman was eaten by a crocodile as she went to fetch water along the shores of lake Victoria on Saturday, at around 6:30pm.

Ruth Nyanzira was seven months pregnant.

One of the residents, Sande Kaabale, said residents tried to rescue her by throwing metals at the reptile, but all was in vain. 

He further revealed that when all efforts to rescue Nyanzira failed, the helpless residents watched on as the huge crocodile swallowed body parts of the deceased in the deeper side of the lake.

The LC1 chairman of Lolwe Upper Village, Mohamed Kibirige, said they have on several occasions requested relevant authorities to intervene by capturing the reptiles.

Locals says the reptiles have terrorized them especially, women who fetch water or bathing children on the shores of the lake.

Kibirige said their requests have fallen on deaf ears.

“They just keep on promising us that things will be okay, but up to now nothing is being done," he said.

The chairman said most of the residents prefer fetching water from the lake, claiming that water from boreholes on the island is salty.

Meanwhile, the LC5 chairman of Namayingo, Ronald Sanya, cautioned locals against moving to the lake shores unaccompanied.

Heurged locals to remain calm since the district had already notified the Uganda Wildlife Authourity (UWA) about the dangerous crocodiles.

Early last year, a team of UWA officers in charge of problematic animals pitched camp in the area and captured three crocodiles believed to have mauled over 30 people in the previous two years.

The officer in charge of Lolwe Police Post, Denis Okello, said remains of Nyanzira were recovered by fishermen Sunday morning, along the shores of Lake Victoria.

The MP of Bukooli islands constituency, Abbot Ouma, said 26 people were mauled by crocodiles on the islands in 2018, adding that 23 others who survived are currently living without hands, legs and other body parts.

Ouma said he is to draft a motion before Parliament that will compel Government to compensate families of crocodile attack victims.

Residents have appealed to Government to rescue them from such attacks.

One of the residents, Jafferi Kibwika, said some of the crocodiles make their way to the mainland to attack the residents. He said they are living in fear because there is no freedom of movement especially during the night.

 

 

 

 

 

Engeri abaana baffe nabazzukulu abakuba obwa Bamalaaya gye bakozesaamu Kalifoomu na magezi amalala okubba abasajja:

By Musasi wa Bukedde

 

Added 24th October 2018

 

Kab1 703x422

Abakazi abagambibwa okubba abasajja baakwatibwa e Nakulabye.

 

ENSIMBI bwezongedde okufuuka enzibu okufuna abakazi abafere b’omukwano ne bamalaaya abalejjesa emibiri ne bayiiya obukodyo bw’okuziggya mu basajja mu bulungi ne mu bubi. Bali mu Kampala n’emiriraano mpozzi n’ebitundu ebirala.

 

Bano bwe bakwata ku basajja ekigendererwa kyabwe kibeera kya kubanyaga ssente ze balina ng’oluusi bazingiramu ebiwandiiko n’essimu. Akamu ku bukodyo mwe bongedde okunyagira abasajja ke k’okusendasenda omusajja naddala be balaba nga balina ku ssente ne babasaba babakyalireko gye basula kyokka bwe kakutanda n’oyitika okugendayo nga bakuwendulira abasajja abakukwata nga bagamba nti bakusanze okusinda omukwano ne mukazi waabwe.

Nashim Musoke abeera e Makindye akakodyo kano akanyumya nga lutabaalo. Agamba nti lumu yali agenze mu bbaala ne mikwano gye ne basanga abakazi abanyirira. Omu ye yasooka okujja we twali nga yeefudde abuliddwa ekifo ekirala w’atuula. Yatubuuza bulungi naye abeera tannabugumya na mbooge banne abalala ne bayingirawo. Twanywamu nabo wabula oluvannyuma tuba twawukana ne tuwaanyisiganya ennamba za ssimu.

 

Oluvannyuma lw’emyezi ng’ena omu ku bawala yankubira essimu wadde nnali namwerabira n’anneeyanjulira nga bwe twasisinkana mu bbaala emu ne musanyusa. Yansaba tusisinkanemu olwo ng’antegeezezza nti abeera Nakulabye.Olwatuuka e Nakulabye natuukira we yandagirira era olwamukubira essimu n’ajja ate n’annyongerayo we yali asula era emmotoka nagisimba mu luggya.

Okutuuka mu muzigo mw’asula yeebuga nnyo n’antegeeza nga bw’anoonya omulimu ogw’okukola nange ne musuubiza omugerezaako. Yambuuza kye nywa wabula mba nkyerowooza n’afuluma nti andeetera sooda wabula mbeera nkyatudde abasajja babiri ne bayingirawo omu n’abwatuka omulundi gumu nti ssebo leero nkukutte ggwe osigula mukyala wange.

Omuwala yabayingirira ku mugongo kyokka okwandibadde okumpolereza yafuluma omuzigo ng’alaba bantabukidde nga batandise okunnyambula n’okunkuba. Bandeka ndi bute ne batandika okunkuba ebifaananyi ku ssimu era mba nkyewozaako ne wajja omwami gwe bannyanjulira nga ssentebe.

Bwe baamunnyonnyola ekiriwo kwe kutusaba tuteese ensonga tuleme kuzitwala wala. Olwo baali bandaalise dda ng’ebifaananyi bwe bagenda okubisaasaanya ku facebook ne WhatsApp oba si kyo mbawe obukadde 3.

Mu kiseera ekyo nalinamu 360,000/- era mu kutya okungi ne nzibawa kyokka nga bwe bampeeka endala. Nakubira mukulu wange nga naye teyalinaawo ssente ne nkubira omulala eyajja kyokka bwe baategeera nti muserikale ne beemulula naffe ne tugenda tufune abaserikale abalala tubakwate.

Bwe twaddayo twasangawo omuwala omulala n’omuvubuka munda nga naye bamutadde mu bufere bwe bumu poliisi n’ekwata omuwala era bwe twetoolola emmanju w’akazigo nga nooli omuwala eyakola omupango gyali ne bakwatibwa kyokka nga ssente zange bazinzigyemu.

Mu May w’omwaka guno waliwo omuvubuka Hussein Ssekimuli eyasangibwa mu kazigo ke yali yakapangisa ng’afiiriddemu kyokka okusinziira ku baliraanwa kigambibwa nti yattibwa bamalaaya nga yosooka kujja n’omu ate omulala n’amwegattako nga kirabika ye yamuzigirira nga bw’alina ssente.

Kigambibwa nti bino byali Kasubi era abakyala baafuluma ssaawa 2.00 ez’ekiro kyokka bagenda okutuuka enkeera nga Ssekimuli mufu. Nga September 24, 2018 abakyala baneekoleragyange ku William Street kigambibwa nti baatayiza omusajja Teijje Tereje eyali abayitako ku lubalaza okumpi n’ebbaala ya ‘’Top pub” ne bamusikaasikanya ne bamuyingiza loogi eri okumpi awo ne bamubbako ebintu bye byonna era abaali okumpi nga balaba be baatemya ku poliisi ya CPS eyasitukiramu n’ekwata bamalaaya 6 abaali beenyigidde mu kikolwa kino.

Obukodyo obulala mwe bayita okubba abasajja mulimu:

 

Okusiiga kalifoomu ku mabeere. Kano akakodyo kettaniddwa nnyo bamalaaya. Bw’omusanga n’omukwana ng’akugamba ye tagenda wuwo nga muteesa kugenda mu loogi bw’atuukayo nga yeefuula agenda mu kinaabiro okunaabako ng’asiiga kalifoomu ku mabeere era oluba okudda g’asooka okukutega era oluganuuna ng’otandika mpola okuggwaamu amaanyi ekiddirira kwebaka. Wano aleka akunyaze buli k’olina mu nsawo.

 

Bakozesa abasajja abalala okukuggyamu ensimbi. Abakyala abamu bambala bulungi ne bagenda mu bifo ebisanyukirwamu ng’omukwana. Ono bwati takutawaanya era akulaga nga kiyinza okuggweera awo era bwe kakutanda n’okkiriza okugenda mu loogi ng’atemya ku banne nga bakulinnya akagere era oluba okutuuka mu loogi ng’abasajja bakonkona nga bacwana nga bwe bakukutte ne mukazi waabwe olwo nga batandika kukupeeka ssente bw’oba toyagala kukwongerayo ku poliisi oba kukuswaza ku mikutu gya ‘social media.’

 

Bakolagana n’abavubuka ababbi Omukazi bw’amanya nti olina emmotoka bwe muba muyingira mu loogi babeera ne ssabuuni mu nsawo zaabwe ng’akugamba nti ebisumuluzo leeta tubitereke muno. Olw’omukwano gwobaako essaawa eyo naawe ng’obiwaayo ky’akola ng’ekisumuluzo akituuza ku ssabbuuni nga bagenda bakisazisa. bwe mwawuka wayita ebbanga ttono ng’emmotoka bagibba. Emirundi egisinga bakubba oli naye nga yabuulira n’ababbi ekigenda mu maaso, akusalira amagezi n’olwawo okukebera ku mmotoka ogenda okizuula nga batuuse wala. 5.Bakuba abasajja obuyondo n’okubazinga mu masuuka.

 

Ng’oggyeko abakyala abalala ababbisa obukodyo obutali bwa kitemu ate bamalaaya abamu batuuka ku mbeera y’okukuba abasajja ababa babaguze obuyondo ku mitwe ne bazinga mu masuuka nga bafudde. 

 

Bakozesa obwana obuto ne bakazi bannaabwe ne babateeka wansi w’ebitanda. olutuuka munda mu loogi gy’aba akututte bw’oyambulamu empale takukkiriza kugiwanika akugamba ogiteke wansi olwo abali wansi w’ekitanda ne bagikebera mugenda okumaliriza nga tosigazza kantu nakamu. Ate tolina bw’omulumiriza kuba obwedda muli mwenna era awo akujuliza nga bwe wabisudde dda.

 

Bayuza obupiira (kondomu). Bano abamu balina omuze gw’okulagira abasajja okwambala obupiira era akola olukujjukujju n’ayuza akapiira olwo n’akugamba nga bwoyinza okubanga ng’omulwaziza, omufunyisizza olubuto. Olwo akugamba musooke mugende mwekebeze bw’alaba ogaana ng’akusaba obukadde nga bubiri naawe olw’okutya okuswala bw’oba ozirina oziwaayo.

 

Bakozesa akakodyo k’okunaaba. Emirundi egisinga bakolagana ne bannanyini loogi ne muyingira olumala okweyambula mwesanyuse ng’akutegeeza nga bw’awulira ebbugumu era mwetaaga okunaaba olwo mulyoke mubeeko kye mukola. Akugamba osookeeyo mu kinaabiro kubanga ye alina ensonyi naawe olw’okuba weesunga kyogendako ng’okkiriza ogenda okudda nga taliiwo, okubuuza bannannyini loogi nga bakutegeeza nti yaakafuluma ate bano batwala empale oleme kwanguwa kubagoberera. 8. Bakwata mu nsawo z’abasajja Abamu kasita amanya ensawo mw’otadde ssente akuweeweeta n’akuteeka mu mbeera nalyoka akubba.

 

Betunda mu biwagu. Kano akakodyo bakakozesa nnyo ,ennaku zino, bw’omusanga n’omusiima ng’akugamba nti okwesanyusaamu nga tonkubye kiisi ziba 10,000/- olutuuka eyo nga akugamba bw’oba oyagala kiisi osasula 20,000/- ate bwoba oyagala okukwata ku bbeere ziba 40,000/- Omwogezi wa poliisi mu Kampala n’emiriraano Luke Oweyesigire yategeezezza nti abakola ebikolwa nga bino poliisi efuba okubakwata ng’eyita mu bikwekweto by’ekola ne basindikibwa mu kkooti. Alabula abantu okuba abagenderevu.

Nb

Mpozzi Mukyala Bobi Wine yanagezaako okubawolereza kubanga abakyala bangi abali mu governmenti ya NRM tebabayambye mukwekolera emirimu egisobola okubayimirizaawo wano e Buganda nga ne bajjajja baabwe bwebabasiima

 

Kilabika nga bo tebatekebwa mumbalirira eno. Kyebava banyakula kubasajja bo bebasanga nga bafuna bulungi sente mumbalirira ya governmenti ya NRM ne World Bank! Kilabika Abalamuzi babasibe e Luzira, nebisumuluzo bisuulibwe mu nyanja.

 

Kakati bano abaana nabazzukulu abawala baffe okukola emirimu gino webuuza World Bank ne governmenti ya NRM, eludde mubuyinza, yabateekamu mu kubalirira wano mu Africa Lower Middle Income Status, okulaba nga nabo bafuna wakati wa dollars 1006 ne dollars 3955 per capita?

 

 

 

 

 

In Uganda, a Charity group has come out to start feeding helpless teenage mothers:

By Richard Wetaya

 

Added 14th September 2017 

 

Feed a Million Mouths Uganda wants to raise 100kg of food sponsorship for teenagers through a Buy Breakfast Campaign

 

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A drama skit showing how teenage girls are lured by men. Photos by Richard Wetaya

 

TEENAGE MOTHERS|NUTRITION

Over the last 10-15 years, adolescent pregnancy rates in Uganda have increased.

Statistics from the health ministry show that 24% of Ugandan girls aged 15 to 19 years are mothers or pregnant with their first child.

According to statistics from the population secretariat, of the 1.2 million pregnancies recorded in Uganda annually, 25% are teenage pregnancies.

However, one of the challenges, pregnant teenagers face today is the lack of knowledge on proper nutrition.

 ome of the guests at the breakfast launchSome of the guests at the breakfast launch

 

“Pregnancy during adolescence is a time of extreme nutritional risk because most teenagers have no knowledge about appropriate nutrition.”

“Teenage mothers should not only be provided with proper nutritional foods, but also information on the right nutritional recommendations,” says Mark Montgomery, the director of Feed a Millions Mouths International.

Montgomery was speaking recently at the Buy Breakfast Campaign event, at the Dancing Cup in Bugolobi, Kampala.

The event-themed-“Importance of nutrition and education for pregnant teens” organised by Feed a  Million Mouths Uganda was meant to support teenage pregnancy centers run by Youth for Christ Uganda

At the event, various stakeholders were given opportunity to buy for as low as sh8,000-high nutritional food, principally high nutrition corn soy blend porridge for the girls at the Youth for Christ Pregnancy Centres in Kakajo, Kivulu and Nankulabye and at risk communities in Lomaratoit- Karamoja.

 ontgomery right speaking at the breakfast campaignMontgomery (right) speaking at the breakfast campaign

 

Montgomery revealed that over 50 girls will be given food assistance as the campaign continues.

“We are looking to raise 100kg of food sponsorship. The more sponsorship we shall get for the Buy Breakfast Campaign, the more high nutrition corn soy blend we shall provide directly to the teenage pregnancy centers,” Montgomery said.

How Buy Breakfast works
An interested person or company buys a breakfast pack, confirms their order and pays for their order through a Feed a Million Mouths sales agent or through mobile money.

The breakfast packs range from 10kg to 100kg.

 Omukyala ono Omukadde mu Uganda yetaagira ddala wabeerewo social welfare mu ggwanga okutaasa obulamu bwe, nobwabaana be mubwangu ddala.

By Musasi wa Bukedde

Added 1st April 2017

 

Nabatanzi, maama w’abaana abeetaaga obuyambi ng’aluka akakeeka.

 

Bya AMON MUKASA

NNAMUKADDE Immaculate Nabatanzi embeera gy’ayitamu okulabirira batabani be ababiri abalina obulemu terojjeka.

Nabatanzi 65, mutuuze w’oku kyalo Kaama mu Ggombolola ye Kimennyedde e Mukono agamba;

Nazaala abaana munaana wabula abawala abasatu ne bafa, ne nsigaza abalenzi bataano. Wabula ababiri kati bafuuse bakateeyamba.

Mutabani wange Christopher Ssebaggala bwe yaweza emyaka 3 n’alumbibwa omusujja n’agongobala newakubadde nga yajjanjabwa! N’okwogera tayogera bulungi.

 

Ssebaggala ne Walusimbi (mu kagaali), abaana ba Nabatanzi.

 

Nazaala omwana omulala Burusia Walusimbi kyokka ng’alinga atalina magumba mu mubiri abasawo ne bahhumya nti ajja kutambula singa nnaamukozesa nnyo dduyiro. Nakikola kyokka era teyatereera, kati be balema ababiri.

Kitaabwe Moses Kasozi bwe yalaba ng’abaana bali mu mbeera eno, n’abula ng’agamba nti ye tazaala balema.

Enju yange ey’ettaka kibuyaga yagisuula, kati bansuza busuza. Bwe natwala Walusimbi ku ssomero, baamungobya.

Omusomesa yangamba, “Oyo omwana agenda kugoba abaana abalala mu ssomero kuba buli muntu lw’amulabako teyeegomba kuleeta mwana we wano.

Kale mukadde, omwana mufunire essomero.” Nawulira nga mpeddemu amaanyi. Buli ssomero gye namutwala, nga bamungobya. Eby’okumusomesa ne mbivaako.

Walusimbi bwe yaweza emyaka 18, yali akoleeza ttadooba n’emwokya ekifuba, olubuto n’omukono ogumu ne gulugenderamu kati yagongobalira ddala n’ebigambo abiggya wala.

Ono kati yeewalula bwewaluzi, ku myaka 28 gy’alina! Omuliro bwe gwamwokya, natuukiriza kitaabwe wabula navaayo na 2,000/- zokka mbu zinnyambe okumujjanjaba.

Ekifuba kya Walusimbi ekyaggya omuliro.

 

Nayisibwa bubi naye ne nguma. Nneebaza omuzirakisa eyampa we tusula.

Mpulira njagala kufuna enju eyange kubanga ndaba nkuze. Ssinga nfuna we nzigya akasente akambeezaawo n’abaana bange, nja kuba mmaze.

Nsaba abazirakisa bannyambe nga bayita ku ssimu; 0787480714 oba 0756419320.

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Tuwulira governmenti eri busy nesente zomuwi womusolo ekola Makubo, Malwaliro, kunyweza Maggye ne Police, nokusasula Emisaala Gyabakozi baayo. Kyeraga kyokka nti terina bweyinza kuyamba batuuze nga bano. Kakati no ekirize abatuuze bano bafune ekibiina ekyabanaku begatte basabe obuyambi ekuva ebweru wensi ya Uganda. Ensonga ebeere emu bweti. Governmenti terina kukwata kusente zino nga zileteddwa munsi ekuyamba abanaku bano!

 

Meeting the first ladies of Africa

 

Veronique Edwards (R) talks to Thandiwe Banda of Zambia
Thandiwe Banda (L), Zambia's first lady, tells the BBC's Veronique Edwards about her private life with her husband

By Joseph Warungu
Editor, BBC Network Africa

In recent weeks, I have been doing just what my mother said I should never do - eavesdrop.

But perhaps she would not mind so much if she knew I had been privy to conversations of the first ladies at five seats of power in Africa.

 

SIA KOROMA, SIERRA LEONE
Sia Koroma

Indeed, the candid interviews, conducted by the BBC Network Africa's Veronique Edwards, give a new perspective on the leaders of the continent and address issues ranging from power and politics to glamour and romance.

Listening to Sierra Leone's Sia Koroma, Namibia's Penehupifo Pohamba, Ghana's Ernestina Mills, Zambia's Thandiwe Banda, and Uganda's Janet Museveni, the most striking thing is that these women care deeply about the condition of society.

As professionals in their own right, these women are actively promoting education and rural development and championing poverty eradication and the fight against HIV/Aids.

Mrs Koroma and Mrs Pohamba are both experienced medical professionals while Mrs Banda and Mrs Mills are teachers.

Family matters

The office of the first lady is not an elected one. This means they cannot directly intervene in the running of the country, despite their proximity to power.

However, some first ladies have been known to take matters firmly into their own hands to whip opponents into shape.

Our five ladies have subtle ways of dealing with their partners, too.

"Being a woman, we have our innate feminine tactics," says Mrs Koroma.

 

JANET MUSEVENI, UGANDA
Uganda's first lady, Janet Museveni

"If I call him 'Mr president' it means I want something from him. And I do call him 'Mr president' sometimes."

For Mrs Museveni, however, it is not enough to live with "power" - she has demanded some of it for herself as an elected MP and minister.

But her appointment to the cabinet, as well as public posts for other close family members, have led to accusations that Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni is running the country like a family business.

"I know that that is rubbish, I'm sorry to say this," said Mrs Museveni.

"But if there is anyone who takes the trouble to do everything by the law, it is my husband."

Uganda's first lady quickly jumps to her husband's defence when it is suggested that having come to power in 1986, he has overstayed his welcome with the voters.

"Every time he's supposed to go back and ask for their support… they give it willingly."

She concludes by confirming that she will retire from active politics after seeking a second, and last, five-year term as an MP at next year's general elections.

'Beat about the bush'

Unlike in the West, where first ladies and their children are political tools to be deployed at will during campaigns, or to help attract sympathy for the man at the helm, African leaders are generally very protective of their private lives.

 

PENEHUPIFO POHAMBA, NAMIBIA
Namibia's first lady, Penehupifo Pohamba

However, Veronique manages to uncover a private view of men who are actually very ordinary, vulnerable and - like many of us - awkward.

"I first met him while I was studying in Germany," says Mrs Pohamba, recalling how the future president of Namibia wooed her and eventually proposed.

"He acted as if he'd been sent by someone else, saying: 'If there is someone who would like to fall in love with you, would you agree?'

"And I said: 'It depends on whether I know the person. If I don't, I won't agree... so who is this person you're talking about?'

"Then he continued beating about the bush and four hours later he said: 'The person I'm talking about is myself'.

"I responded: 'Wuh! Let me think about it'.

"We met again much later in Angola and fell in love and he proposed to me - on his knees."

Twin palpitations

If the Namibian president was having a hard time securing a future wife, Zambian leader Rupiah Banda, who already has grown up children with his late wife and grandchildren, had palpitations when he heard the news that he had become a father again.

 

THANDIWE BANDA, ZAMBIA
Zambia's first lady, Thandiwe Banda

"At the time, I didn't know I was expecting," his wife said.

"I went to the hospital to check why my stomach was becoming so uncomfortable.

"After the scan the doctor asked me if I was pregnant and I said: 'No'. Then he informed me that I was two months pregnant with twins.

"When I called my husband with the news, he was in shock. He said: 'No, no…really?...No!' He may have been expecting a child, but two was a pleasant surprise."

Zambia's first lady says she would like to see the establishment of a formal office of the first lady with a government budget allocation to support her public work.

However, this is a view that has provoked controversy in some countries, with many people questioning the need for a formal role for first ladies describing it as a waste of money. They argue that because the first ladies are unelected, they are not directly accountable to the people.

Sweetie Pie

Ghana's first lady does not have children of her own.

But as a teacher she is passionate about young people and works hard to promote literacy, especially for some of the girls in rural areas whose education is sometimes disrupted by social pressures, including men who prey on them.

 

ERNESTINA MILLS, GHANA
Ghana's first lady, Ernestina Mills

But when at home, and away from her duties as a first lady, Mrs Mills spends time with her dogs, a habit she inherited from her father. One dog is called Tandy, another is Max. Then there is Candy and Sweetie Pie. With names like these it is hardly surprising that she talks to them all the time.

"They understand," she says, becoming animated.

"They lie on their back and I scratch their chest and they're happy!"

Although wining and dining with the high and mighty should bring happiness to many people, Africa's "first ladies" have their regrets.

'No more discos'

Despite the fulfilment they get from serving their societies and helping to improve life in Africa, they miss one thing: freedom.

"I used to wear normal clothes that a mother with two kids would wear. You know, easy clothes like jeans and a T-shirt," Mrs Banda recalls.

"Now there are some clothes that I can't wear because everyone - especially young people - look up to me; I need to set a good example."

 

AFRICA ON THE BBC
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For Namibia's Mrs Pohamba, before her life was surrounded by bodyguards and state protocol, music used to be the food of her soul and body.

"I can't dance any more... this house is like a prison... you're not really free, not like how I was in the old days.

"I could go to the disco, and then return to my house and start dancing again and doing this and that. That is no more."

Mrs Koroma will also not mind leaving State House when the time comes. Although her husband is only in the middle of his first term in office, she is clear about an exit plan.

"There's a golden rule in politics: You must know when to come in and when to get out.

"That is my motto and I'm going to stand by it. That exit is very important."

 

Of African women on the Belgian streets and when one remembers what the Belgians did to the black heads in the Congo during the 18th and 19th century:

 

On A Black Sisters Street, by Nigerian Chika Unigwe. PHOTOS | COURTESY 

By Kari Mutu

Posted  Saturday, March 11   2017 

IN SUMMARY

  • This is a story about the sex industry and trafficking of African women to Belgium, although the same could apply to foreign prostitutes in many European countries.
 According to a 2016 report by the UN’s International Organisation for Migration, about 80 per cent of Nigerian women who arrived in Europe in 2016 would be trafficked into prostitution.

I read this article recently and it reminded me of the book On Black Sisters Street, by Nigerian Chika Unigwe, published in 2009, that highlights a tragedy that continues to this day.

Sisi, Ama, Joyce and Efe, four African women brought up in difficult circumstances, now work in the city of Antwerp in Belgium as prostitutes. Efe is a single mother with a fierce determination to succeed; Joyce was shaped by war and will not tell anyone her real name; Ama desires to find her father; and the mysterious Sisi, a university graduate, had high hopes for her future.

The women work in the red light district, sending money home to support the families they left behind. They live together in Zwartezusterstraat, which literally means “black sister street,” and share an apartment with their pimp.

Each chapter focuses on the narrative of one woman, drawing us into their mindset. We learn about their childhood, and how they ended up in prostitution.

This is a story about the sex industry and trafficking of African women to Belgium, although the same could apply to foreign prostitutes in many European countries.

The unfortunate women usually come from poor backgrounds or war situations, and are tricked into the trade, or knowingly enter it, for the promise of jobs and better lives in Europe.

The story about African sex workers in Europe is not new, but Unigwe has created an enthralling tale, giving voice to a forgotten demographic living a dangerous existence overseas. You get to understand the desperation of women who once had big dreams and now find themselves trapped abroad with little recourse to the law. Nor can they return home since they owe huge debts to their smugglers.

All the male characters are portrayed negatively, aligning with the reality of many working girls. And while it is easy to chastise women who engage in sex for pay, the story is a reminder for us not to judge a book by its cover.

The main characters are well portrayed, and Unigwe was able to inject humour into the tale. The writing is unsentimental and detailed, with bits of pidgin English and Igbo.

Unigwe has been called one of Africa’s top five writers, and in 2012 she won the Nigeria Prize for Literature, the biggest book award in Africa with a purse of $100,000.

She now lives in the US, but previously lived in Belgium for a number of years. She reportedly walked through Antwerp’s red light district on numerous occasions, and obtained first-hand stories from real prostitutes whom she met. On Black Sisters Street was originally written in Dutch and has been translated into several languages.

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One wants not to believe it that the kicking of black heads in the Congolese African country, brought about the English football as we all know it today.